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Charlotte Caldwell, and her son Billy, stand outside the Home Office during a break in a meeting with officials to discuss how Billy can have his severe epilepsy treated with cannabis oil, which is a banned substance in Britain, in London, June 11, 2018. LONDON — The British government announced Tuesday it would move to lift its ban on cannabis-based medicines, amid mounting criticism over the denial of treatment to severely epileptic children. But it rejected calls to legalize marijuana for recreational use. Home Secretary Sajid Javid told lawmakers cases like that of a 12-year-old epileptic boy denied cannabis oil for his condition showed there is “a pressing need to allow those who might benefit from cannabis based medicines to access them.” But he said the government had “absolutely no plans” to decriminalize the drug more widely. His announcement came as Canada’s Senate approved legislation that will soon decriminalize marijuana for recreational use in the North American nation.  The change in stance came after the British government relented and allowed 12-year-old Billy Caldwell to receive cannabis oil treatment that his mother said was needed to prevent life-threatening seizures. After Canada, will UK be next to legalize marijuana?

thumbnail courtesy of cbsnews.com

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