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If you need further help setting your homepage, check your browser’s Help menu 2018 Guide to Drones in Law Enforcement The acting commissioner announced several new initiatives to address internal corruption, including the polygraphing of officers working in some units By Kevin Rector
The Baltimore Sun BALTIMORE — Baltimore’s acting police commissioner on Friday announced several new initiatives to address internal corruption — including the polygraphing of officers working in some units — even as he abruptly pulled back his appointment of a deputy commissioner. Acting Commissioner Darryl De Sousa said he put on hold his appointment Thursday of Thomas Cassella as deputy commissioner of operations — a key position overseeing the day-to-day work of thousands of officers — after becoming aware of an internal document that was addressed to him weeks ago but leaked Thursday. The document describes complaints made against Cassella a decade ago, including one accusing him of creating a hostile work environment. Further confusion followed with the reversal of another reported personnel decision to transfer 14 officers, including Sgt. Alicia White, an officer charged in the Freddie Gray case, to the department’s Internal Affairs section. Officials said a department-wide email announcing the change was sent in De Sousa’s name without authorization. Baltimore police introducing tests to weed out corruption

thumbnail courtesy of policeone.com

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